Plant Of The Week

Sugar Maple
Monday October 21
The Sugar Maple is one of the most important Canadian trees, being, with the black maple, the major source of sap for making maple syrup. In maple syrup production from Acer saccharum, the sap is extracted from the trees using a tap placed into a hole drilled through the phloem, just inside the bark. The collected sap is then boiled. As the sap boils, the water is evaporated off and the syrup left behind. Forty gallons of maple sap are required to be boiled to produce only 1 gallon of pure syrup. - Wikipedia
Fall Witch Hazel
Tuesday October 15
The leaves and bark of the North American witch-hazel, Hamamelis virginiana, may be used to produce an astringent decoction as a cooling agent for various uses in traditional medicine, herbalism, and skincare products. This decoction was widely used for medicinal purposes by Native Americans and is typically sold in modern pharmacies as witch-hazel water and as semisolid ointments, creams, gels, and salves. - Wikipedia
Beauty Berry
Tuesday October 08
The fruit of Beauty Berry is a berry, 2–5 mm diameter and pink to red-purple with a highly distinctive metallic lustre, are very conspicuous in clusters on the bare branches after the leaves fall. The berries last well into the winter or dry season and are an important survival food for birds and other animals, though they will not eat them until other sources are depleted. The berries are highly astringent but are made into wine and jelly. - Wikipedia
Anemone
Tuesday October 01
Anemone is a genus of about 200 species of flowering plants in the family Ranunculaceae, native to temperate zones. The genus is closely related to Pulsatilla ('Pasque flower') and Hepatica; some botanists even include both of these genera within Anemone. Anemone are called "wind flowers". Anemone is derived from the Greek word anemoi, which in English means "winds". - Wikipedia
New York Aster
Tuesday September 24
Symphyotrichum novi-belgii also known as New York aster is the type species for Symphyotrichum, a genus of the family Asteraceae whose species were once considered to be Asters. This species grows in abandoned fields and wet meadows in eastern Canada and the northeastern United States.Wikipedia

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