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Black Locust
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Black Locust
Clematis
Wisteria
Hawthorn
Forsythia
Daffodils
Star Magnolia
Cornelian Cherry Dogwood
Propagating From Mound Layering
Bristlecone Pine
Lacebark Pine
Propagating From Ground Layering
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More From Plant Talk

  • Black Locust

    The tree was identified in 1607 at Jamestown by British colonists, who used the timber…

  • Clematis

    Clematis terniflora is a plant in the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae. It is native to northeastern…

  • Wisteria

    Wisteria is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae, that includes ten…

  • Hawthorn

    The "haws" or fruits of the common hawthorn, C. monogyna, are edible. In the United…

Plant Talk Blog

Propagating From Mound Layering
Friday February 25
Mound layering a simple way to propagate low, shrubby plants. With this technique, the shrub is partially buried in a mound of well drained soil mix. The buries stems will then sprout roots along their lengths. This method can provides many new plants with little…
Propagating From Ground Layering
Friday February 11
Layering, and ground layering in particular, is the easiest method and the one most likely to produce successful results. Layering allows future cuttings to form their own roots before being detached from the parents plant. In ground layering, a section of a flexible branch is…
Propagating From Cuttings
Friday January 28
The easiest cutting propagation method for trees and shrubs is to start cuttings taken in the late summer or early fall from new, but mature, growth that has not yet become completely woody. These are called semi-ripe, semi-mature, or semi-hardwood cuttings. Follow these steps to…
Tree Topping
Friday January 14
One pruning practice that should never be used is tree topping. Topping is done in an attempt to control height or size, to prevent trees from growing into overhead power lines, to allow more light onto a property or to prevent a tall tree from…
When To Plant
Friday December 31
For the most part, trees and shrubs can be planted at any time of year, though some seasons are better for the plants and more convenient than others.  Spring is a very good time to plant. It gives the tree or shrub an entire growing…

Plant Of The Week

Black Locust
Monday May 23
The tree was identified in 1607 at Jamestown by British colonists, who used the timber to build houses. The tree was named for its resemblance to Ceratonia siliqua, known as the "Old World Locust". 
Clematis
Monday May 16
Clematis terniflora is a plant in the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae. It is native to northeastern Asia. It was introduced into the United States in the late 1800s as an ornamental garden plant, and has naturalized in many of the eastern states.Wikipedia
Wisteria
Monday May 09
Wisteria is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae, that includes ten species of woody twining vines that are native to China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Southern Canada, the Eastern United States, and north of Iran. 
Hawthorn
Monday May 02
The "haws" or fruits of the common hawthorn, C. monogyna, are edible. In the United Kingdom, they are sometimes used to make a jelly or homemade wine.
Forsythia
Monday April 25
The flowers are produced in the early spring before the leaves, bright yellow with a deeply four-lobed flower, the petals joined only at the base. These become pendent in rainy weather thus shielding the reproductive parts. The fruit is a dry capsule, containing several winged seeds.

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